George Mason Researcher Creates Simulated Traffic Accident To Test Emergency Response

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George Mason Researcher Creates Simulated Traffic Accident To Test Emergency Response

May 26, 2016

"At 9:15 on a rainy Thursday morning a police dispatcher radioed a call to emergency medical technicians: “There is an accident with injury, a single vehicle with the patient not acting appropriately at 4600 West Ox Road.”

A late-model blue BMW had crashed. The driver, sitting upright, wasn’t moving or responding to the arriving EMTs who pulled up in an ambulance followed by a fire truck. Unbeknownst to them, the driver was suffering from serious internal bleeding. The driver was carefully removed from the car and strapped to a gurney before being loaded into the ambulance and taken to the hospital.

The “driver” was in fact a manikin, a life-sized accident victim equipped with two electronic beacons that were pinging every three seconds to receivers at Inova Fairfax Hospital. The vehicles, equipment, EMTs, emergency room personnel and others involved in responding to the emergency were also equipped with Bluetooth beacons that recorded their proximity to the manikin, which was relayed in real time to observers at the hospital."

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